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Number of search results: 145

Bill Jones | D-924 By Brian Giboney   (Sep 2018) People Profiles

Bill Jones, D-924, is a legendary skydiver, instructor, drop zone owner, innovator and the patriarch of a large skydiving family. Nearly the entire Jones family jumps: six of his children have made their livings from skydiving, and five of the six still do. At age 86—after actively sport jumping for more than 50 years—Jones still has skydiving goals, proving that this is a sport for life.

39 Members to Run for USPA Board   (Aug 2018) Homepage Industry News

As of August 2, 2018, 39 members will appear on the ballot in the upcoming election for USPA’s Board of Directors. All 22 seats on the board are up for grabs, with 18 members vying for the eight National Director slots and 21 members running as Regional Director candidates.

Safety Check | Harness-and-Container Fit By Jim Crouch   (Aug 2018) Homepage Safety & Training Safety Check

A properly sized and adjusted harness-and-container is essential to your safety both in freefall and under canopy. It’s likely that many jumpers who are reading this right now are in real danger of coming out of their harnesses during their next skydives and don’t even realize it.

The Warm Embrace Of Thailand By Jim McCormick   (Aug 2018) Parachutist Features

Thailand is magical. It deserves to be referred to as the “Land of Smiles.” Anyone who has been there will tell you it’s unforgettable. The air is warm and damp. Transitioning to the outdoors from an air-conditioned space feels like a warm embrace.

Rating Corner | Guiding New Graduates By Jim Crouch   (Aug 2018) Safety & Training The Rating Corner

Have you ever spent months working with a student, ensuring that you covered each category and transferred the necessary knowledge and skills, then proudly stamped the A-license card and watched in disbelief as he ran off to sign up for a 10-way speedstar competition with a freshly mounted GoPro on his helmet?

NAA Selects Skydiving World Record as “Most Memorable”   (Jul 2018) Parachutist Competition Records Industry News Competition News

Each year, the National Aeronautic Association selects what it considers aviation's most memorable records from the previous year and honors those records at an event near Washington, D.C. 

Nailing The Record Photo by Steve Shorten   (Jul 2018) Featured Photos Five Minute Call Featured Photo Five Minute Call

Photo By Steve Shorten | D-27932

Jumpers Paul Cochran, Art Cross, Tim Guy, Daryl Harmon, Mike McCormick, Jim Nelson, Dana Parker, Dick Pigg, Bob Summers, Jim Trimby and Ed Zell set the 11-way Indiana Skydivers Over Sixty Record for Largest Formation Skydive over Frankfort, Indiana.

Watch Out for Wombats! by U.S. TopPOP James Davis   (Jul 2018) Features

On April 19, 132 members of the Parachutists Over Phorty Society (and subgroups Skydivers Over Sixty, Jumpers Over Seventy and Jumpers Over Eighty) made the trek to the rural drop zone for the 14th POPS World Meet, temporarily increasing the town’s population by 11 percent.

One More Jumper: The SoS World Record Week by Carol Jones and Doug Garr   (Jul 2018) Features

The record series kicked off on April 20. First up was the three-day JOS world record event. Thirty-two skydivers in their 70s from Canada, Germany, Sweden and the U.S. participated.

Rating Corner | License and Rating Paperwork by Jim Crouch   (Jul 2018) Safety & Training The Rating Corner

Skydiving coaches, instructors and instructor examiners would much rather spend time in the air skydiving than on the ground handling paperwork. While this is understandable (hey, nobody likes to fill out forms, right?), each rating holder’s administrative responsibilities are extremely important. 

Safety Check | Downsizing by Jim Crouch   (Jul 2018) Safety & Training Safety Check

“When can I downsize to a smaller main canopy?” This is probably the most commonly asked question at every drop zone around the world. It seems like everyone—from newly licensed jumpers to those with thousands of skydives—wants to jump a smaller parachute. The answer to the question is tricky and can mean the difference between an uneventful experience and a serious injury or even fatality. 

Keep an Eye Out |  Setting the Brakes by Jim Crouch   (Jul 2018) Homepage Safety & Training Keep An Eye Out

After landing, a jumper set his brakes and left the rig for a packer. The packer noticed that the jumper had stowed the left brake incorrectly by placing the toggle through the cat’s eye above the metal guide ring, which will not secure the brake line. The brake line would have released during deployment and resulted in a spinning main parachute if the other brake remained stowed. This common packing error is easily preventable by paying attention and stowing your brakes correctly.

USPA Seeks New Director of Safety & Training   (Jun 2018) Parachutist Homepage Industry News

"Over 18 years, through profound changes in skydiving equipment, procedures, and methods of instruction, Jim has worked hard to produce the dramatic decline in serious accidents in our sport."

Safety Check | Knowing Your Gear By Jim Crouch   (Jun 2018) Safety & Training Safety Check

In a sport that requires correctly functioning equipment for your survival, how much do you really know about your skydiving gear? Each year, fatal and non-fatal accidents stem from issues with skydiving equipment. The vast majority of these could have been avoided had the jumpers simply known more about their gear or performed basic gear checks to discover the problem before boarding or exiting the airplane. 

Lake Wales Revisited By Brian Pangburn   (Jun 2018) Homepage Features

The Spring Fling—which started at the Florida Skydiving Center in Lake Wales back in 2004 with only 18 participants—has grown to be the world’s largest annual gathering of canopy formation skydivers (aka canopy relative workers or CRW dogs). The 2018 Spring Fling, which returned to Lake Wales this year, attracted 112 participants from 10 countries.

Rating Corner | A Wake-Up Call By Jim Crouch   (Jun 2018) Safety & Training The Rating Corner

Last August, two tandem double fatalities occurred just a week apart. The details for both of those tragic accidents can be found in “Incident Reports” in this issue of Parachutist. While the casual observer may not see a correlation between the two accidents, they should be a flashing neon warning sign that screams for every tandem examiner, Safety and Training Advisor and drop zone operator to regularly review staff members’ tandem procedures.

Safety Check | Knowing Your Gear By Jim Crouch   (Jun 2018) Safety & Training Safety Check

In a sport that requires correctly functioning equipment for your survival, how much do you really know about your skydiving gear? Each year, fatal and non-fatal accidents stem from issues with skydiving equipment. The vast majority of these could have been avoided had the jumpers simply known more about their gear or performed basic gear checks to discover the problem before boarding or exiting the airplane. 

World's First Twelve-Man Star   (May 2018) Parachutist Homepage
Rating Corner | Rule Changes Affecting Rating Holders by Jim Crouch   (May 2018) The Rating Corner

Several changes that came out of the March 2-4 USPA Board meeting in San Antonio, Texas, affect USPA rating holders.

Safety Check | Instructing Wingsuit Flyers by Jim Crouch   (May 2018) Safety Check

Over the years, many hoped that the wingsuiting community would develop safely without the need for heavy-handed regulation from USPA. Those who opposed a wingsuit instructor rating argued that USPA does not—and should not—require specific training for or regulate advanced skydiving such as freeflying or high-performance canopy piloting. The best example of a skydiving discipline that developed excellent training methods and safety guidelines without requiring USPA regulation is canopy formation skydiving. The pioneers of canopy formation skydiving learned what worked well and what didn’t work well and formulated the best processes and techniques for teaching jumpers who are new to the discipline. Those guidelines continued to evolve and improve, and now it is very rare that a fatality occurs during a canopy formation jump. 

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